Shoaib Akhtar expresses displeasure on ICC’s decision

Shoaib Akhtar expresses displeasure on ICC’s decision
Shoaib Akhtar expresses displeasure on ICC’s decision
Shoaib Akhtar expresses displeasure on ICC’s decision

Former fast bowler Shoaib Akhtar, who was in the audience for the ICC T20 World Cup final between New Zealand and Australia on Sunday, thought the International Cricket Council’s (ICC) decision to name Aussie David Warner Man of the Tournament was unjust.

Warner scored 289 runs in seven innings, averaging 48.16 runs per inning and hitting three half-centuries.
Warner scored his third-half goal in the championship game. With 173 required, the left-handed opener gave the team a boost, and despite being dismissed shortly after scoring his destructive half-century, he completed the task at hand.

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However, what Akhtar and millions of fans all over the world desired was not Warner, but Pakistan skipper Babar Azam, who was named player of the tournament for his outstanding batting throughout the T20 World Cup. Akhtar took to Twitter to express his disappointment, writing, “Was really looking forward to seeing @babarazam258 become Man of the Tournament.” The unfair decision, to say the least.” Babar had been on fire since the start of the tournament. He scored 303 runs in six innings, with a strike rate of 126.25 and an average of 60.60. He is also the top batsman to have scored the most runs in his first T20 World Cup, surpassing Australia’s former batter Matthew Hayden, who scored 265 in his debut in 2007.

Pakistan’s batter began his tournament with an unbeaten 68 against archrival India. Following that, he scored three half-centuries in a row against Afghanistan, Namibia, and Scotland.

His consistent batting performance throughout the tournament has helped him reclaim the top spot in the ICC T20I Men’s rankings.
He is also the second player after Pakistan batsman-wicketkeeper Mohammad Rizwan to have scored the most runs (826) in a single calendar year (1033).

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